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My employer offers contribution matching up to 3% into a group RSP with RBC. Within it I am restricted to owning GICs and RBC mutual funds. If you’ve done any of your own research or read some of my other pages you know that I am not a fan of mutual funds. At first I thought I could just open my own RRSP elsewhere and contribute there, but in doing so I’d give up the 3% salary contribution match. What if I just transferred any contributions from my RBC account into my other RRSP biweekly as they came? And that doesn’t include the opportunity cost of keeping that money out of the market for up to a month. Turns out RBC charges $50 to transfer funds, and it will take 2-4 weeks to transfer. My RRSP has upwards of 38 years to appreciate(since I’m only 27 right now), so an annual or even bi-annual transfer is almost certainly in my future. The promise of even marginal gains( Compounding interest is a magical thing! I can’t just let the money sit there and rot away until I accumulate enough to justify a $50 transfer. It’s time to take a close critical look at what my options are. When I started this job I knew next to nothing about investing, and I just assumed some magical thing was happening when money went into my RRSP. Turns out I was auto-investing in Guaranteed Investment Certificates (GIC), which DO have their place, but with 38 years ahead of me now is not the time to be conservative! The interest rate on these bad boys was a whopping 1.3%, and with inflation of 2% that’s a net loss of 0.7% per year! Our group RSP also gives access to the world of RBC mutual funds, and shortly after realizing I needed to ditch the GICs I called RBC, filled out my risk profile, and they recommended putting my money into RBC Select Aggressive Growth, which I blindly did. Fast forward to now and I thought I’d take a closer look at this fund. It has good allocation with 32.1% Canadian equity, 29.2% US equity, and 35.4% international equity. Good industry allocation with 25% in financials, and about 10% in the next top 4 (consumer products, IT, industrials, health care). Where it fails my criteria is a MER of 2.14%, and returns that don’t seem to be able to justify the high MER. But alas, maybe it is the best fund for me at this time. Data analysis and lots of assumptions on future performance! I’m only reviewing the funds I can actually own in my RRSP, which is most of them on this page, excluding any USD funds. I’ve summarized them all in an excel file which is where all the images on this page come from. I used the most up to date information they had, which ends July 31, 2015. I arbitrarily chose colours to differentiate between the types of funds according to the criteria below: I’m mostly considering funds based on my own needs, and the best funds for you, dear reader, may be different. Right now I have this RRSP, a TFSA, and a non-registered account. To make the most of my tax efficiency I need to hold bonds, US, and international equity in my RRSP. If you have questions about investing tax efficiency I recommend checking out Freedom Thirty Five’s blog post or Canadian Couch Potato. Here are the top 25 funds ranked according to their total return since inception. The first thing you should notice is that the top 13 funds are all less than 3.5 years old. Anything born after 2008 hasn’t lived through a market crash, and actually has been riding the 5 year bull market after said crash. So it’s really only fair to consider funds that lived through at least 1 crash. In my opinion the best performing fund is #15, Canadian Dividend. It has managed to hold onto over 10% annualized return despite living through the 20 crash. A MER of 1.76% is high, but much lower than all the funds surrounding it. Except maybe the O’Shaughnessy Canadian Equity fund, but that fund returned 2.5% less than Canadian Dividend. The other two funds that really catch my eye are #21 and #25. They have similar performance but 24 has a proven track record over the past 40 years. And remember that interest from bonds is taxed at your full income tax rate. Anyway the most interesting thing about this ranking is that the #2 spot goes to an . Bonds are more conservative, but I’m not totally dismissing them just because I’m young. Think about it, the fund that just sat and did nothing outperformed ALL of the actively managed funds except Life Science/tech. Most appealing in this section: Lets see who took advantage of the recent bull market best. And not by a little bit, but by nearly 4% every year over 5 years! It’s pretty clear that Life Sciences and Technology won that race, those sectors have been booming recently. Checking the calendar returns shows that in the past 10 years, the index fund RBF557 outperformed the nearly identical equity mutual fund RBF263 in 8/10 years. I kept finding this trend over and over comparing RBC index funds to their mutual fund counterparts. It’s clear that USA was the place to put your money over the past 5 years. All those purple global funds hold a large percentage in US stocks, which explains why they are also living large up top. The fund my money is currently riding on finally made an appearance in spot #19. It’s clear now that my money is better put elsewhere. Most appealing this section: To reiterate, this is from Jan 1st 2015 to July 31st 2015. Meaning it doesn’t include the massive losses we’ve seen in August. In fact international stock has topped out most of the US funds. And a quick check reveals that life sciences has dropped to the #4 position. Largely thanks to Japan because #24 there excludes Japan and look where it got them (24th place). And good old Emerging Markets Bonds made it into the top 25! Since the August shenanigans it has only dropped about 1%, which is what normally occurs with bonds during market crashes. Just for kicks I made this list up to 26 to include my old slacker friend Aggressive Growth. Well I don’t know about you guys, but I’m not sure I can stomach the -44% in 2013 even if I got back to back years of 65% returns. It seems other people have done a similar analysis to what I’ve done. Not pictured is most of the complete portfolio funds falling between rank 26 and 47 (out of 88 funds total) Mostly for fun, I’ll talk about some winners and losers in a few interesting categories. You did make up for it in 2013 with a 43.1% gain in one year. Canadian equity income came out of nowhere on this one! The thing about Life/Tech is that for 3 years it did basically nothing, then lost 29% in 2008. I am willing to bet that the reason there is so much yellow here is because RBC advisors recommend those most. However your compatriots made up for it in 2009 (and 2007? The top 4 in this list also correspond to the worst returns of any fund in all 10 years. Bonds are the way to save yourself in a market crash! After 4 years you are heavily in the red on this fund, do you realistically think you would have kept your money in what appeared to be a dying fund like that? Not that there’s anything wrong with any of these funds. For pure returns you can do better though based on everything that I’ve mentioned so far. It’s interesting to see that the #5 spot goes to a fund started only 6 years ago, compared to the second youngest fund being 22 years old. I assume that there was a big demand for a “very conservative” fund after the 2008 crash. It has performed well so far with its worst year being 2.5%. These are NOT ranked, they are ordered according to their tracking number. Speaking for myself, I plan to hold all my Canadian equity in my taxable account, and most of my international and US equity in my TFSA. My RRSP is going to be home for bonds and some more US equity. I included the Canadian and international equity funds just in case you feel like creating your own “balanced portfolio solution” instead of using RBCs prepackaged ones. This way you could decide exactly how much of each sector you wanted to invest. A possible portfolio might be: I hesitated including Canadian Dividend on this list because of how favorably dividends are taxed. Since the gains in your RRSP are all tax-free (sort of) you are better off keeping Canadian equity in a taxable account and saving tax-sheltered RRSP space for investments that are heavily taxed. Ultimately it’s more important to get started investing than it is to find the “perfect” investment. If you only have one of the prepackaged portfolio funds you’ll be fine. If you want to stretch your RRSP as far as you can you should start customizing your investments. Remember that a 0.2% higher return can get you an extra $25,000! This is a good time to mention that what you have read here or anywhere on this website is for educational purposes only and does not constitute professional financial advice. Do your own research and accept the consequences of your actions. I am not responsible for any financial losses that may result from you acting on the information you received by using this site. Once again, click the link below to download the file I used in my research (Don’t worry it’s clean). Or you can click here to be taken to the RBC webpage that should have the latest statistics on these funds. I’m changing three of my recommendations since I didn’t realize that I’m contradicting myself with the verdict above. RBC Mutual Fund Comparison excel file If you found anything else worth mentioning about these funds I’d love to hear about it. I should follow my own advice and not buy funds with a high MER. Here are the replacements: I left in RBF274 and RBF497 because I feel they are a good way to increase the risk (and hopefully reward) in a young person’s portfolio. They come at the cost of a higher MER, but RBC doesn’t offer any low cost index funds in these sectors. Like I mentioned above, in some rare cases a high MER can be justified if it’s the only way to get those returns. The four index funds are the same ones recommended by the Canadian Couch Potato. Most mutual funds are offered in different series or classes. Each series is described in the fund’s prospectus – the document that describes the fund’s objectives, strategies, fees, expenses and risks. Certain series are available to retail investors like you –individual investors who buy and sell securities for their personal accounts – while others are sold to institutional investors such as pension funds or insurance companies. Mutual fund series are typically named with letters of the alphabet. Although there are no strict naming standards across the mutual fund industry, there are some conventions. For example, Series A or A Class funds are usually sold by an investment advisor, and Series F funds are usually only for fee-based accounts. That said, here are some tips to help you navigate the various fund series at the major fund companies. Management Expense Ratio When reading a fund prospectus, you’ll no doubt come across the term management expense ratio (MER). The MER shows the cost of running a particular mutual fund and represents the fund management’s fees, operating expenses and HST charged to the fund. The MER is expressed as an annual percentage and is built into the daily per unit price of a mutual fund (the NAV, or net asset value). Note: The MER does not include trading costs, which are disclosed separately as a trading expense ratio (TER). These typically form a small fraction of a fund’s expenses. Many investors value the professional management of their mutual funds. Reducing MER fees where possible, however, can improve the long-term performance of a portfolio. It’s important to remember that fees alone should not be the deciding factor when evaluating the merits of holding mutual funds. and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Bank of Canada and is a Member of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Royal Bank of Canada and certain of its issuers are related to RBC Direct Investing Inc. does not provide investment advice or recommendations regarding the purchase or sale of any securities. Mutual Fund companies may assess additional fees — for example, deferred sales charges on back-end load funds, early redemption fees, setup fees and charges for insufficient funds on pre-authorized purchases. Investors are responsible for their own investment decisions. Management fees and operating expenses are paid by the mutual fund. RBC Direct Investing is a business name used by RBC Direct Investing Inc. RBC and Royal Bank are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. There may be trailing commissions associated with these mutual fund investments. There may be commissions, trailing commissions, management fees and expenses associated with mutual fund investments. Please read the prospectus or Fund Facts before investing. Mutual funds are not guaranteed or covered by the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation or by any other government deposit insurer, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated. For money market funds there can be no assurances that the fund will be able to maintain its net asset value per security at a constant amount or that the full amount of your investment in the fund will be returned to you. Rbc mutual fund prices about rbc A list of top-quality mutual funds from a variety of fund companies with information from RBC Dominion Securities mutual fund research analysts. Convenient, built-in diversification When you invest in a mutual fund, you're investing in a diversified portfolio of investments that can include stocks, bonds and cash. Detailed price information for RBC Canadian Dividend Fund Series A - NL CADFUNDS RBF266. CF from The Globe and Mail including charting and trades And professional expertise when you invest in mutual funds. Whether you’re looking for equity, fixed income or money market mutual funds, it’s easy to find the best one to match your investment objectives. Choosing a mutual fund can seem like a daunting task. Thousands of funds exist, and the same fund can be available in more than one series with different fees or investment minimums. The matches you receive will be the lowest-cost versions available, including Series D funds wherever possible. Higher-priced versions of funds, the ones designed for financial advisors and their clients, are typically excluded. Mutual Fund companies may assess additional fees – for example, deferred sales charges on back-end load funds, early redemption fees, setup fees and charges for insufficient funds on pre-authorized purchases. Management fees and operating expenses are paid by the mutual fund. There may be trailing commissions associated with these mutual fund investments. There may be commissions, trailing commissions, management fees and expenses associated with mutual fund investments. Please read the prospectus or Fund Facts before investing. Mutual funds are not guaranteed, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated. For money market funds there can be no assurances that the fund will be able to maintain its net asset value per security at a constant amount or that the full amount of your investment in the fund will be returned to you. Mutual funds have struggled to keep up with the market lately. Active management means you have to be extremely good at what you do. As Warren Buffett says, "Most people aren't cut out psychologically for investing." While I wholeheartedly believe that active investors can still beat the market, it's not common. So if you want to find mutual funds worth your money, you have to dig deep. The Vanguard Health Care Fund Investor Shares mutual fund invests in the healthcare industry, with a heavy focus on biotechnology and healthcare equipment. It's one of the few mutual funds that can claim an average total annual return higher than the S&P 500. Since its inception, the fund has averaged 16.18% per year. On a shorter timeline, things aren't quite as competitive. Through the past five years, the fund averaged 8.8% per year, versus 11.7% from the S&P. Overall, though, I like the fund because I think the healthcare sector is a good long-term play. The aging population will only require more medical care, and the sector as a whole stands to benefit. But I think those fears are overblown, given that we haven't seen any meaningful changes to the system regardless of who's in power in Washington. Some investors may worry about the ramifications of any federal reforms to the U. I view healthcare as more recession-proof than other industries and therefore think this mutual fund is a great play. Information technology and software are here to stay, and the Fidelity Select Software & IT Services Portfolio fund has done incredibly well in outperforming the market since the fund's inception. By investing in the likes of Microsoft, Visa, Adobe, and salesforce.com, the fund has had a 38.87% run over a one-year period, versus the S&P 500's 31.49% spurt. Since its inception in 1985, the fund has averaged 16.24% per year, outpacing the S&P's 10.79%. Even in poor recent years for the market, such as 2015, this mutual fund managed 10.31% growth. And even with tax-adjusted returns, the fund has averaged 23.42% over a three-year period. Morningstar gives the mutual fund a five-star rating, with below-average risk for the category. aims to invest in undervalued equities with consistent dividend yields. Since its inception, the fund has kept relative pace with the S&P 500. Over the shorter term, however, it has lagged the market somewhat as large growth ruled the day. I include the name as a play on the potential shift back to value as investors constantly attempt to calculate the likelihood of a pullback or recession on the horizon. Holdings are 23.91% invested in financials, with names including Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase, as well as Verizon and Boeing. But an emphasis on value and dividends is something that belongs in every portfolio. The Vanguard Balanced Index Fund Admiral Shares carries 40% of its holdings in bonds, a good hedge against fears of an eventual recession that could shift assets somewhat away from equities. Bonds may be boring and certainly do reduce the potential of returns. However, they add an element of safety to the list of equity-based funds I've put forth. Market watchers have noticed the recent outflows from equity funds, with more allocation moving into bonds and cash. The fund's bond allocation is 45.87% in the government sector, 25.33% in the corporate sector, and 23.79% in securitized assets. While offering exposure to bonds, Vanguard Balanced Index Fund still holds popular names including Microsoft, Apple, Amazon.com, and Berkshire Hathaway. carries an expense ratio of 0.52 and invests in low-price stocks. The list includes small and medium-sized businesses; its top 10 holdings include United Health Group, Ross Stores, Seagate Technology, Best Buy, Auto Zone, and Metlife. Morningstar gives the fund a five-star rating, with low risk. Since its inception in 1989, the fund has averaged an annual return of 13.35%. More recently, it has lagged the market a bit, as more large-cap growth names dominate the market. Nonetheless, the low-risk nature of the fund, and its historical track record of outperforming, make it worth a look. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Teresa Kersten, an employee of Linked In, a Microsoft subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. David Butler has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon, Apple, Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), Microsoft, Salesforce.com, and Visa. The Motley Fool recommends Adobe Systems, United Health Group, and Verizon Communications and recommends the following options: long January 2021 $200 calls on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), short January 2021 $200 puts on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), long January 2021 $85 calls on Microsoft, short January 2020 $220 calls on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), and short January 2021 $115 calls on Microsoft.


Mutual Fund companies assess additional fees – for example, deferred sales charges on back-end load funds, early redemption fees, setup fees and charges for insufficient funds on pre-authorized purchases. Management fees and operating expenses are paid by the mutual fund. There may be trailing commissions associated with these mutual fund investments. There may be commissions, trailing commissions, management fees and expenses associated with mutual fund investments. Please read the prospectus or Fund Facts before investing. Mutual funds are not guaranteed, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated. For money market funds there can be no assurances that the fund will be able to maintain its net asset value per security at a constant amount or that the full amount of your investment in the fund will be returned to you. Investing in Canada can be done through mutual funds. The following is Top 10 Popular Canadian Mutual Funds. These funds include: Fidelity Canadian Asset Allocation Ser B, Investors Dividend Cm RBC Canadian Dividend, TD Canadian Bond I, CI Harbour Growth & Income, RBC Monthly Income, and more. Please check back for more popular and best investment funds on my website. Introduction Mutual Funds have become popular in Canada for investment vehicle. In general mutual funds can be divided into three main categories: Money Market Funds, Fixed Income Funds or Bond Funds, and Equity Funds or Stock Funds. From these main categories, some of these funds may be classified into individual branches such as: As investors, you need to be proactive in your investing style either for asset diversification or capital appreciation. Choosing the right fund or funds may be one of the reasons. Several reasons to invest in these popular Canadian investment funds are: As the most popular investment fund, this Fidelity Canadian Asset Allocation fund's objective is to achieve high total investment return. This balanced fund uses an asset allocation approach. It invests mainly in a mix of Canadian equity securities or stocks, fixed income securities or bonds, and money market instruments. It may also invest in foreign securities to take advantage of market opportunities. Morningstar has rated this Canadian investment fund with 4-stars rating. Since its inception, this fund has recorded 13 years of positive return. Fund Details This Fidelity Canadian Asset Allocation Series Fund manager is Robert Swanson since April 2006. There is no 12b1 fee or front-end sales load fee for this fund. The best achievement occurred in year 2009 with 24.81%. It also has 3 years of negative return and the worst performance occurred in year 2008 with -19.26%. The performance of this mutual fund based on the load adjusted returns is 11.87% over the past year and 5.99% over the past ten years. Should you are interested to invest in this Canadian fund; you will need 500 CAD for either regular brokerage or IRA account. Investor will need 50 CAD minimum for subsequent investment. The other series of this Fidelity Canadian Asset Allocation Series Fund are Series A, Series T5, Series T8, Series S5, Series S8, Series F and Series O. Please take note that there is other quite similar fund in Fidelity, which is Fidelity Canadian Asset Allocation Class. The top ten investments of this fund as of May 2011 are Cash & Cash Equivalents, Toronto-Dominion Bank, Suncor Energy, Potash Corp of Saskatchewan, Canada Housing Trust No.1, Cenovus Energy, Bank of Nova Scotia, Goldcorp, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and Enbridge. There are total 701 investments and these top ten investments make up 29.8% of the total fund. Principal Risks of this fidelity fund include Credit risk, Equity risk, Interest rate risk, etc. More details can be found from the fund's prospectus and website. The Investors Dividend fund seeks to provide above-average income yield on its investments, protect the value of its investments, and achieve long-term capital appreciation consistent with the fulfillment of the first two objectives. This fund is categorized in Canadian Equity Balanced category. This Investors Group mutual fund has been introduced to public since March 1962. It also has a yield of 3.65% per year and the annual expense ratio is 2.89%. This fund has 21.29% annual holdings turnover rate. Dividend Funds Since its inception, this equity fund has recorded 37 years of positive return and 11 years of negative return. The best 1-year total return was achieved in year 2009 with 25.76% and the worst performance was occurred in year 2008 with -22.50%. This fund has returned 13.23% over the past year and 5.27% over the past ten years. The Morningstar has given this Investors Dividend fund with 3-stars rating. The other classes of this fund are Class A and Class B. The top holdings of this fund as of May 2011 are Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Nova Scotia, Trans Canada Corp, Bank of Montreal, CI Financial, Manulife Financial, Husky Energy, Power Financial Corp, TELUS Corp and Grest-West Lifeco. The top sector weightings as of May 2011 are Financials (51.50%), Energy (18.78%), Other (11.99%), Telecommunication Services (9.30%), Utilities (4.93%), Consumer Discretionary (2.21%) and Consumer Staples (1.29%). As one of the big mutual fund firm, RBC offers several popular mutual funds. RBC Canadian Dividend fund is one of this investment fund. RBC Canadian Dividend fund seeks to achieve long-term total returns consisting of regular dividend income, which benefits from the preferential tax treatment given to dividend income, and modest long-term capital growth. This RBC fund invests mostly in common and preferred shares of major Canadian companies with above average dividend yields. This RBC Canadian Dividend fund is categorized in the Canadian Dividend and Income Equity category. As mentioned, this fund is managed under the management of RBC Global Asset Management Inc. Stuart Kedwell has managed this fund since April 2007. It has returned 18.02% over the past year, 2.75% over the past three years and 8.32% over the past ten years. To start investing in this RBC fund, you will need a minimum of 500 CAD for either regular brokerage or IRA account. Currently, the fund's dividend yield is 1.27% per year. This fund has recorded 14 years of positive return and 3 years of negative return. The minimum subsequent investment for both accounts is 25 CAD. The best achievement was achieved in year 1997 with 35.38%. There are many other classes or series available for this fund, such as: The asset mix of this fund as of June 2011 is 92.0% in Canadian Equity, 4.0% in Cash, 2.4% in Fixed Income, 1.1% in US Equity and 0.5% in Other. The top ten holdings are The Toronto-Dominion Bank (6.9%), Royal Bank of Canada (6.9%), Bank of Nova Scotia (5.2%), Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (3.7%), Bank of Montreal (3.6%), Suncor Energy Inc (3.3%), Enbridge Inc (3.1%), Power Corporation of Canada Sub Vtg (2.9%), Brookfield Asset Management Inc A (2.9%) and Manulife Financial Corporation (2.7%). This total holdings of this fund are 104, consists of 77 stock holdings, 11 in bond holdings and 16 in other holdings. Listed as the forth popular fund, this TD Canadian Bond fund invests primarily in high quality bonds and other debt issued by Canadian governments and companies. Up to 30% of the fund may be invested in foreign securities. This TD Canadian bond fund was created and introduced to public in June 29, 1988. There is 1.08% Management Expense ratio if you are investing in this Toronto Dominion fund. This fixed income fund is managed by TD Asset Management Inc. This fund is classified as Canadian Fixed Income investment fund. As of July 2011, this fund has total assets of C$ 9.84 billion. The minimum amount to invest in this fund either in non-RSP investment or RSP investment is $100. The minimum subsequent investment applies for both investments ($100). Morningstar has ranked this fund with 4-stars return rating. This best fund has returned 6.79% over the past year and 6.22% over the past ten years. For YTD, this fund is on the 9% rank in the Canadian Fixed Income Category. The benchmark of this fund is Bof A Canada Board Market TR CAD. The top investments of this fund as of June 2011 are Province of Ontario Residual, Government of Canada, The Toronto-Dominion Bank, Government of Canada, Cash & Other Net Assets, Manulife Financial Capital Trust and Alberta Capital Finance Authority. The top ten investments out of total 212 investments represent 19.3% of total fund value. The investment assets as of June 2011 are allocated as follow Corporate Bonds (59.7%), Federal Bonds & Guarantees (15.4%), Provincial Bonds & Guarantees (13.4%), Mortgage-Backed Securities (5.5%), Supranationals (3.2%), Cash & Other Net Asses (1.7%), and Municipal Bonds (1.1%). This CI Harbour Growth & Income fund's objective is to obtain long-term total return through a prudent balance of income and capital appreciation. It invests primarily in equity and equity-related securities of mid- to large-capitalization Canadian companies and fixed income securities issued by Canadian governments and companies. The proportion of the fund's assets invested in equity and fixed income securities may vary according to market conditions. Any change to the investment objective must be approved by a majority of votes cast at a meeting of unit holders held for that reason. As part of CI Financial Group advisor, Gerald Coleman has been managing this CI fund since its inception in June 1997. This fund is in the category of Tactical Balanced fund. This fund doesn't share any dividend yield and the annual expense ratio is 2.40%. This equity fund has performed in the past 13 years with 11 years of positive return & 2 years of negative return. This fund's best 1-year total return was achieved in year 2009 with 21.20%. Based on the load adjusted return, this fund has returned 13.9% over the past year and 3.0% over the past five years. Besides Class A, this fund is also available in Class F and Class I. As of July 2011, the top ten holdings of this fund represent 35.36% of the total portfolio. They are Suncor Energy, Tim Hortons, BHP Billiton Limited, Canadian National Railway, Intact Financial, Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan, TD Bank, Bank of Nova Scotia, Manulife Financial, and JP Morgan Chase & Co. The asset allocation of this fund is Canadian Equity (49.3%), Cash (18.7%), United States Equity (16.6%), International Equity (10.3%) and Bond (5.1%). This fund has annual holdings turnover rate of 38.8%. Morningstar gave this RBC Monthly Income fund with 5 stars rating. As the second RBC mutual fund in this popular fund list, the RBC Monthly Income fund seeks to provide relatively tax efficient monthly distributions consisting of dividend income, interest income and capital gains, and the potential for modest capital growth. Since its inception, this RBC investment fund has 11 years of positive return and only 2 years of negative return. The fund will try to provide a high regular monthly income. The best achievement of 1-year total return was achieved in 2000 with 19.77%. Money Market Fund This RBC fund has been managed by Jennifer Mc Clelland since April 2007. Based on the load adjusted return, this fund has returned 7.68% over the past ten years, and 4.22% over the past three years. Investor may choose from the other series of this fund, such as Series Advisor with Front End load (Code: RBF763), Series Advisor with Low Load (Code: RBF115) and Series F with No Load (Code: RBF602). She is the Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager of Canadian Equities. The top 5 sectors of this fund as of June 2011 are Financials (41.8%), Energy (22.0%), Materials (12.5%), Consumer Discretionary (5.1%) and Industrials (5.0%). The top 25 holdings of this fund represent 37.0% of the total portfolio. This RBC fund has a total of 315 holdings as of June 2011 that consists of 101 stock holdings, 204 bond holdings and 10 other holdings. The RBC Balanced fund objective is to provide a combination of capital growth and modest income. This RBC fund invest majority of assets in a balance of Canadian equities or stocks, bonds (fixed incomes), and short-term debt securities. This RBC fund was introduced to public in September 1987. To start investing in this fund, you will need a minimum investment of $500 with the subsequent investment of $25. This popular mutual fund has returned 5.84% over the past year and 3.86% over the past ten years. While popular, it only receives 2-stars rating from Morningstar. The other series of this fund are Advisor Series (with choice of Differed Sales Load or Front End Load or Low Load), F Series with No Load and T Series with No Load. As of June 2011, the asset mix of this RBC Balanced fund is Canadian Equity (37.2%), Fixed Income (34.5%), US Equity (12.5%), International Equity (10.9%) and Cash (5.0%). The top holdings of this fund are RBC Emerging Market, Canada Government, The Toronto-Dominion Bank, Royal Bank of Canada, Suncor Energy Inc, Bank of Nova Scotia, Quebec Prov and Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. The RBC Select Conservative Portfolio fund is seeking to offer income and the potential for moderate capital growth. This RBC Select Conservative Portfolio fund invests mostly in other RBC Funds, emphasizing mutual funds that invest in Canadian fixed income securities. These RBC fund typically have the potential to generate income. As part of fund of funds, the fund's portfolio maintains a balance of investments across several asset classes for diversification. This fund is in the category of Global Neutral Balanced fund. As part of RBC Global Asset Management, this RBC Select Conservative Portfolio fund was established on December 1986. It shares 1.26% of dividend yield that is distributed quarterly. If any capital gains exist, it is distributed annually. This balanced fund is currently open to new investors with the minimum investment of $500 for either regular brokerage account or retirement (IRA) account. There is a compulsory of $25 subsequent investment. For the no load fund, there is Series F (Code: RBF657) available. For the Advisor Series, there are three options: Advisor Series with Deferred Sales Load, Advisor Series with Front End Load and Advisor Series with Low Load. It also has achieved 21 years of positive return and 3 years of negative return. This fund has returned 3.89% over the past decade and 2.30% over the past five years. This RBC Select Conservative Portfolio fund has a total of 1,590 underlying holdings (729 bond holdings, 692 stock holdings, 169 other holdings, and 12 portfolio holdings). The asset mix of this fund as of June 2011 is Fixed Income (50.9%), Canadian Equity (16.3%), US Equity (12.2%), International Equity (11.2%) and Cash (9.3%). The top 5 sectors are Financials, Energy, Materials, Industrials and Consumer Discretionary. As the fifth popular RBC fund in this list, RBC Bond fund seeks to achieve above average, long-term total returns consisting of interest income and moderate capital growth. This RBC fund invests primarily in high-quality bonds or fixed incomes issued by Canadian governments and corporations. This RBC Bond Fund is categorized as one of the investment fund in Canadian Fixed Income Fund. This bond fund was introduced to public in July 1966. This fund has an annual expense ratio rate of 1.18% and it also has an annual holdings turnover rate of 45%. This fund has 3.06% dividend yield and this dividend is paid quarterly. The total net assets of this fund are $7.2 billion. The fund uses DEX Universe Bond Index as its benchmark. Morningstar has rated this fund with 3-stars return rating. It has 5.03% YTD return, which is the highest among all the other funds mentioned in this article. The performance of this fund is as below: The asset mix of this fund as of June 2011 is Fixed Income (97.1%) and Cash (2.9%). The fixed income breakdown is Corporate Bonds (51.7%), Government Bond (43.7%), ST Investments (2.9%), Other Bonds (1.4%), Asset Backed Securities (0.2%) and Mortgage Backed Securities (0.1%). The top 25 holdings out of 448 total holdings of this fund represent 29.5% of the total portfolio. CIBC Monthly Income fund's objective is to provide a reasonably consistent level of monthly income while attempting to preserve capital. This CIBC fund invests most of the fund assets in a diversified portfolio of debt and equity instruments. Fund Details David Graham has been managing this fund since December 2007. This CIBC Monthly Income fund was introduced to public in September 1998. This yield figure is the highest among the other funds in this article. As of July 2011, the fund has total net assets of $7.0 billion. Morningstar has given 3-stars return rating to this fund. The fund has returned 6.88% over the past ten years, 2.07% over the past five years, 1.85% over the past three years and 6.48% over the past year. If you are interested to invest in this fund, you will need a minimum initial investment of $500 with $25 minimum subsequent investment. The top ten holdings of this fund as of July 2011 are Cash & Cash Equivalents, Canada Housing Trust No.1, 2.75%, 2016/06/15, Royal Bank of Canada, Toronto-Dominion Bank (The), Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Suncor Energy Inc., BCE Inc., Barrick Gold Corp., Manulife Financial Corp. Rbc mutual fund prices banque royale canada In depth view into RBC Canadian Dividend Fund A Price including historical data from 1993, charts and stats. The average expense ratio from all mutual funds is 0.69%. 71.74% of all the mutual funds are no load funds. The oldest fund launched was in 1987. The average manager tenure for all managers at RBC Global Asset Management. is 11.78 years. The company offers investors 18 mutual funds, in terms of the number of individual fund symbols. A list of top-quality mutual funds from a variety of fund companies with information from RBC Dominion Securities mutual fund research analysts. Convenient, built-in diversification When you invest in a mutual fund, you're investing in a diversified portfolio of investments that can include stocks, bonds and cash. BMO Mutual Funds are offered by BMO Investments Inc., a financial services firm and a separate legal entity from Bank of Montreal. Commissions, trailing commissions, management fees and expenses all may be associated with mutual fund investments. Please read the fund facts or prospectus before investing. Mutual funds are not guaranteed, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated.