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Canadian woman of Egyptian descent is suing Royal Bank of Canada and the Peel Regional Police for violating her Charter rights after she was detained and labelled a criminal while trying to withdraw money from one of her own bank accounts, according to her statement of claim. Peel Police confirmed the lawsuit but a spokesperson said the police would not comment on the matter as it was before the courts. 24 at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice alleges the bank and the police treated Dana Ramadan, 31, differently “solely because she was a Muslim, Middle Eastern POC (Person of Colour)” and accuses them of inflicting mental distress. It also accuses the bank of slander for allegedly telling the police she was a criminal. It further accuses the bank employees of “holding a discriminatory belief” based on Ramadan’s identity that “she was potentially engaging in a terrorist activity.” RBC denies those allegations. In a statement to the Star an RBC spokesperson said, “We understand this has been a difficult situation and we apologized to Ms. Ramadan is a Toronto businesswoman who had two business accounts at RBC; one a solo account for her financial consulting company, the other a joint account with a partner for their mortgage brokerage firm. Ramadan for any inconvenience our extra due diligence caused her. Ramadan told the Star she went to an RBC branch the morning of Feb. We take any allegations of discrimination seriously and our actions were intended to protect our client from potential fraud.” The allegations have not been proven in court. 14, 2019 to withdraw $10,000 from her solo business account. It was not unusual for Ramadan to withdraw sums in the thousands of dollars from her accounts with RBC in years past, she said. Later that day, around 4.20 p.m., she went to another RBC branch, this one in Mississauga where her office is, to withdraw the remaining $6,000. She said she took her debit card and the same passport, left her purse in her car and went in. When she got there, she said, she was told the branch didn’t have that amount of cash but that she could withdraw $4,000. She showed her Quebec licence, which she carried because she used to go back and forth between Montreal and Toronto. There, according to Ramadan’s statement of claim, the teller told her a manager override was required for that sum. But because the address on it didn’t match the Toronto business address the bank had on file, the teller asked for a secondary ID. Ten minutes later the teller came back with a manager. When the manager asked for her ID, Ramadan handed over her passport. The manager took the passport and came back five minutes later and told Ramadan she would be getting the money. “I waited for what I thought were the funds,” Ramadan told the Star, “I’m just sitting there and all of a sudden, next thing I know a police officer puts a hand on my shoulder. I was so shocked, like what the hell is going on.” Someone from the bank had called the police asking them to detain a person impersonating an RBC account holder, who was using a false passport to commit a fraud, according to the claim. If the bank had been suspicious they could have asked other security questions or for other IDs, Ramadan said, but they didn’t. “We followed our established procedures to verify her identity,” its statement to the Star said. “When asked for supporting ID, she provided her passport. After she was unable to answer questions about the details on her accounts, security questions and provide further identification, we were concerned someone was attempting to defraud our client. After carefully reviewing the situation, we alerted the authorities to protect our client from fraud. Her identity was eventually verified and the transaction was processed.” Ramadan flatly denied this in an email. “RBC did not ask me any security questions about my account. Had they done so, I would have answered them all accurately, as they were my OWN (capitals hers) accounts that I set up. By February 2019 I had been an RBC customer for approximately 15 years. “At no point was I asked for any further identification by any of the bank employees. I had several other valid IDs in my purse which was in the car. I would have easily been able to go out for a minute and grab all of the IDs they wanted if they asked me,” she said. According to the claim, the police refused to let Ramadan go to her car to produce secondary ID. A police officer took “one look at the passport and says it looks fake,” she told the Star on the phone. I don’t know till this day why would he say the passport was fake.” Peel police have not commented on this case. She was escorted to a manager’s office in front of everyone, Ramadan said. I’m sure you can call some agency.’ ” During this time, someone from the bank called her business partner in the mortgage brokerage and told him an impersonator was trying to access their joint account, her claim says. Another unidentified police officer guarded the door “to prevent the plaintiff from leaving,” her claim alleges. After another 10 minutes, she says the officer told her, “I can’t verify the passport.” “I’m getting anxious. The bank denies this, saying they simply told the partner they needed to verify Ramadan’s identity. Ramadan would not have a Quebec driver’s licence.” Ramadan’s claim says the partner asked if he could speak to her to verify her identity but the bank refused. It alleges her partner ended his business relationship with her after this. At the bank, Ramadan said, police asked her many questions. It was only after she correctly answered questions about past traffic violations that the police began to believe her. The bank then gave her the $6,000 from her account and she went home. Rattled and upset, “I was treated like a criminal,” she said, but at least she was free. “After all that torture, it was all over.” Not so fast. Ramadan’s account of what happened up to now is the basis for her allegations of slander, false imprisonment and Charter violations (of unlawfully seizing her passport and searching it, arbitrarily detaining her, not telling her she had a right to a lawyer and discriminating based on race, ethnicity etc.). What she said followed next was the reason the word “terrorist” was used in Ramadan’s lawsuit. The next morning, she logged into her account to make an e-transfer. Even more strange, she said, the $6,000 transaction was not recorded. I was getting paranoid.” The transaction never went missing,” RBC’s statement to the Star says. That meant she had $6,000 in hand as well as $6,000 in the bank. It was put on hold as “a precaution during the interaction with the client. Due to a system limitation, the transaction had to be manually reconciled with bank records the following day and the hold was removed.” But Ramadan told the Star she made two e-transfers from that same bank account the night of the interaction with the bank. ” The phone conversation when someone from the branch called Ramadan back, which she recorded, didn’t help, she said. The employee asked her at least twice why she withdrew $6,000 in cash. “RBC policies and procedures did not require clients to explain the purposes for withdrawing cash,” her claim states. “RBC’s ongoing suspicion of the Plaintiff was grounded solely upon the Plaintiff being of Middle Eastern descent and being a POC.” The bank denies the allegations. “In my opinion, had I, a white “Christian” male presented a valid Canadian passport as ID, RBC wouldn’t have phoned the police, frozen my account, and questioned me the following day about what the money was for,” said Ramadan’s lawyer Christopher Murphy. In its statement of defence RBC said it was Ramadan’s own actions that led its employees to believe she was committing identity theft. It says she did not order the cash in advance and was “disrespectful and unco-operative” at the first bank; when asked for her local address, she told the employee she didn’t have to give it to the bank, that it was private. It says she was asked to leave after that first transaction and told her behaviour was not acceptable. The bank’s statement characterizes its actions as due diligence to protect its clients from fraud, but Murphy disagrees. Distilled into its essence, RBC’s defence is that Dana — a person of colour — became uppity when questioned about her valid ID, so RBC was justified in reporting her to the police,” Murphy said. “Rather than apologizing for their reprehensible conduct, RBC continues to blame Ms. RBC’s lack of insight into their practices should concern all people of colour who bank at RBC.” Ramadan is seeking $170,000 in damages plus loss of income and legal costs. She is also seeking “aggravated and punitive damages” from the bank employees and police officers involved, “in order to deter the defendants, or those similarly situated, from taking such wrongful actions in the future.” This case comes on the heels of another incident in the public eye where Maxwell Johnson, a Heiltsuk Nation man and his granddaughter were handcuffed and detained at a BMO branch in Vancouver when they went to open an account. In that case, BMO maintains there were problems with their ID that included an Indian status card and birth certificate. It accepts that the bank should never have called police, but that bank, too, denies racism was a factor in that decision. C.’s police complaint commissioner ordered a probe into the police handling of the incident. Shree Paradkar is a Toronto-based staff columnist covering issues around race and gender. Also these days most legit business use transactions over online. There are transaction amounts which are to be immediately reported. I have seen mainland china "people" bring bricks of cash, withdrawing or depositing, at HSBC. Follow her on Twitter: @Shree Paradkar Banks are very careful with people withdrawing large amount of cash. Cash usually means money laundering or tax evasion. AML (Anti Money Laundering) is very serious at financial institutions. Tellers are instructed to report unusual or suspicious activity to their managers. If the woman were blond Westerner, would she have experienced the same treatment at the bank? There are transaction amounts which are to be immediately reported. Err on the side of caution and let the managers further up use their discretion on whether the situation needs escalating or not. But being proven to be complicit in, say, aiding terrorism is catastrophic to confidence in a bank and it's image of stability. Also these days most legit business use transactions over online. AML (Anti Money Laundering) is very serious at financial institutions. Tellers are instructed to report unusual or suspicious activity to their managers. All the facts are not yet out in this case but clearly, the wrong call was made and decisions were actioned based on incomplete info. Banks are very careful with people withdrawing large amount of cash. Cash usually means money laundering or tax evasion. Err on the side of caution and let the managers further up use their discretion on whether the situation needs escalating or not. But being proven to be complicit in, say, aiding terrorism is catastrophic to confidence in a bank and it's image of stability. All the facts are not yet out in this case but clearly, the wrong call was made and decisions were actioned based on incomplete info. This case comes on the heels of another incident in the public eye where Maxwell Johnson, a Heiltsuk Nation man and his granddaughter were handcuffed and detained at a BMO branch in Vancouver when they went to open an account. I'm sure the bank security cameras will tell a lot of the story . Each time I go to the bank for a large amount I make sure to bring plenty of ID . In that case, BMO maintains there were problems with their ID that included an Indian status card and birth certificate. Not sure why she only took her debit card and passport and left her purse in the car . I'm sure the bank security cameras will tell a lot of the story . Each time I go to the bank for a large amount I make sure to bring plenty of ID . It accepts that the bank should never have called police, but that bank, too, denies racism was a factor in that decision. Not sure why she only took her debit card and passport and left her purse in the car . I rather have a bank do its DD then having some one steal my money. Yes bank should not have called the cops and they should have a cell number on file. A 23-year-old woman hit in the back by a stray police bullet alleges in a $21-million lawsuit against the Peel Regional Police force that Chief Jennifer Evans came to her hospital bed after the shooting and promised her a career in law enforcement. A 23-year-old woman hit in the back by a stray police bullet alleges Peel Regional Police Chief Jennifer Evans came to her hospital bed hours later promised to pave the way for her career in law enforcement. The allegation is contained in a $21-million lawsuit filed against Evans, the Regional of Peel Police Services Board and all of the officers involved in the shooting on March 20, 2015 that left Suzan Zreik with a bullet lodged near her spine. Her statement of claim outlines her version of that night's events: it alleges officers denied her timely access to medical care, kept her parents from seeing her in hospital, and tried to coerce her into clearing Peel Regional Police officers of any wrongdoing. ​​Zreik, then a second-year college student in police foundations, had been standing in her family's kitchen when a bullet pierced her family's window. Police had been responding to a call at a neighbour's home when they started shooting. In the statement's depiction of the events, it also alleges that investigators brought Zreik to the police station less than 12 hours after she was shot, wearing only sweatpants and a hospital gown, high on morphine and a with a bullet still lodged two centimetres from her spine. They were "trying to take advantage of her and have her agree to things on video while she was in a highly vulnerable state," the lawsuit says. The lawsuit alleges that when she was taken to hospital, police posted a guard outside her door and prevented her family from seeing her. "She assured my client that she would do anything she could to help her out and gave her a business card with a cell number on it," Zreik's lawyer, Michael Moon said in an interview Friday. told her he'd been ordered by the chief to take her to 12 Division to question her." Moon said the chief interfered in what should have been an SIU investigation in order to preserve the probe's independence. "To me it would suggest that the SIU had not been informed by Peel Regional Police about the seriousness or the extent of Ms. Zreik's injuries, which in and of itself is a breach of their statutory obligations under the Police Services Act." Investigators with the police watchdog did not interview Zreik until three days after she was shot. A news release sent out by the SIU on March 21 said they were investigating the fatal shooting of Marc Ekamba-Boekwa, who had been inside the Queen Frederica Drive home to which police were called on March 20. The province's civilian police watchdog sent out a subsequent note on March 27, noting that they were also investigating how the officers' actions led to Zreik's shooting. Zreik underwent surgery to have the bullet removed from her back in April 2015. She now walks with a cane and suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, the statement says. Josh Colley said he could not comment on the case when contacted Friday. Rbc peel rbc ligne RBC Branch and ATM Locator. Address Bramalea City Centre 25 Peel Centre Dr Brampton, ON, L6T 3R5 Phone 905 790-7120 Transit # 792. Branch Details. Branch Hours. Printed materials in alternative formats We're here to meet your needs. At Royal Bank, meeting the diverse needs of our clients is a top priority. To accommodate everyone, we offer a wide range of accessible banking services. You can receive RBC materials in a number of formats, including large type, audio cassettes, CDs, Braille and e-text. (b) RBC will burst easily while cells of onion peel will resist the bursting to some extent because RBC doesn’t have mechanism to resist endosmosis while onion cell wall puts a mechanical barrier to promote entry of water. You generally add salt into the vegetables during cooking process. 24 at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice alleges the bank and the police treated Dana Ramadan, 31, differently “solely because she was a Muslim, Middle Eastern POC” and accuses them of inflicting mental distress Source: Toronto Star Link: Shree Paradkar: This Egyptian-Canadian woman went to withdraw her own money at RBC.


A routing number identifies the financial institution and the branch to which a payment item is directed. Along with the account number, it is essential for delivering payments through the clearing system. In Canada, there are two formats for routing numbers: An Electronic Fund Transactions (EFT) routing number is comprised of a three-digit financial institution number and a five-digit branch number, preceded by a "leading zero". Example : 0XXXYYYYY The electronic routing number is used for routing electronic payment items, such as direct deposits and wire transfers. MICR Numbers or widely known as Transit Numbers are used in cheques processing. It appears on the bottom of negotiable instruments such as checks identifying the financial institution on which it was drawn. A paper (MICR) routing number is comprised of a three-digit financial institution number and a five-digit branch number. It is encoded using magnetic ink on paper payment items (such as cheques). A Canadian woman of Egyptian descent is suing Royal Bank of Canada and the Peel Regional Police for violating her Charter rights after she was detained and labelled a criminal while trying to withdraw money from one of her own bank accounts, according to her statement of claim. Peel Police confirmed the lawsuit but a spokesperson said the police would not comment on the matter as it was before the courts. 24 at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice alleges the bank and the police treated Dana Ramadan, 31, differently “solely because she was a Muslim, Middle Eastern POC (Person of Colour)” and accuses them of inflicting mental distress. It also accuses the bank of slander for allegedly telling the police she was a criminal. It further accuses the bank employees of “holding a discriminatory belief” based on Ramadan’s identity that “she was potentially engaging in a terrorist activity.”RBC denies those allegations. In a statement to the Star an RBC spokesperson said, “We understand this has been a difficult situation and we apologized to Ms. Ramadan is a Toronto businesswoman who had two business accounts at RBC; one a solo account for her financial consulting company, the other a joint account with a partner for their mortgage brokerage firm. Ramadan for any inconvenience our extra due diligence caused her. Ramadan told the Star she went to an RBC branch the morning of Feb. We take any allegations of discrimination seriously and our actions were intended to protect our client from potential fraud.”The allegations have not been proven in court. 14, 2019 to withdraw $10,000 from her solo business account. It was not unusual for Ramadan to withdraw sums in the thousands of dollars from her accounts with RBC in years past, she said. Later that day, around 4.20 p.m., she went to another RBC branch, this one in Mississauga where her office is, to withdraw the remaining $6,000. She said she took her debit card and the same passport, left her purse in her car and went in. When she got there, she said, she was told the branch didn’t have that amount of cash but that she could withdraw $4,000. She showed her Quebec licence, which she carried because she used to go back and forth between Montreal and Toronto. There, according to Ramadan’s statement of claim, the teller told her a manager override was required for that sum. But because the address on it didn’t match the Toronto business address the bank had on file, the teller asked for a secondary ID. Ten minutes later the teller came back with a manager. When the manager asked for her ID, Ramadan handed over her passport. The manager took the passport and came back five minutes later and told Ramadan she would be getting the money.“I waited for what I thought were the funds,” Ramadan told the Star, “I’m just sitting there and all of a sudden, next thing I know a police officer puts a hand on my shoulder. I was so shocked, like what the hell is going on.”Someone from the bank had called the police asking them to detain a person impersonating an RBC account holder, who was using a false passport to commit a fraud, according to the claim. If the bank had been suspicious they could have asked other security questions or for other IDs, Ramadan said, but they didn’t. The bank says it did.“We followed our established procedures to verify her identity,” its statement to the Star said. “When asked for supporting ID, she provided her passport. After she was unable to answer questions about the details on her accounts, security questions and provide further identification, we were concerned someone was attempting to defraud our client. After carefully reviewing the situation, we alerted the authorities to protect our client from fraud. Her identity was eventually verified and the transaction was processed.”Ramadan flatly denied this in an email.“RBC did not ask me any security questions about my account. Had they done so, I would have answered them all accurately, as they were my OWN (capitals hers) accounts that I set up. By February 2019 I had been an RBC customer for approximately 15 years.“At no point was I asked for any further identification by any of the bank employees. I had several other valid IDs in my purse which was in the car. I would have easily been able to go out for a minute and grab all of the IDs they wanted if they asked me,” she said. According to the claim, the police refused to let Ramadan go to her car to produce secondary ID. A police officer took “one look at the passport and says it looks fake,” she told the Star on the phone. I don’t know till this day why would he say the passport was fake.”Peel police have not commented on this case. She was escorted to a manager’s office in front of everyone, Ramadan said. Another unidentified police officer guarded the door “to prevent the plaintiff from leaving,” her claim alleges.“I was humiliated,” she said. I’m sure you can call some agency.’ ”During this time, someone from the bank called her business partner in the mortgage brokerage and told him an impersonator was trying to access their joint account, her claim says. After another 10 minutes, she says the officer told her, “I can’t verify the passport.”“I’m getting anxious. The bank denies this, saying they simply told the partner they needed to verify Ramadan’s identity. Ramadan would not have a Quebec driver’s licence.”Ramadan’s claim says the partner asked if he could speak to her to verify her identity but the bank refused. It alleges her partner ended his business relationship with her after this. At the bank, Ramadan said, police asked her many questions. It was only after she correctly answered questions about past traffic violations that the police began to believe her. The bank then gave her the $6,000 from her account and she went home. Rattled and upset, “I was treated like a criminal,” she said, but at least she was free. “After all that torture, it was all over.”Not so fast. Ramadan’s account of what happened up to now is the basis for her allegations of slander, false imprisonment and Charter violations (of unlawfully seizing her passport and searching it, arbitrarily detaining her, not telling her she had a right to a lawyer and discriminating based on race, ethnicity etc.). What she said followed next was the reason the word “terrorist” was used in Ramadan’s lawsuit. The next morning, she logged into her account to make an e-transfer. Even more strange, she said, the $6,000 transaction was not recorded. I was getting paranoid.” “The transaction never went missing,” RBC’s statement to the Star says. That meant she had $6,000 in hand as well as $6,000 in the bank. It was put on hold as “a precaution during the interaction with the client. Due to a system limitation, the transaction had to be manually reconciled with bank records the following day and the hold was removed.”But Ramadan told the Star she made two e-transfers from that same bank account the night of the interaction with the bank. ”The phone conversation when someone from the branch called Ramadan back, which she recorded, didn’t help, she said. The employee asked her at least twice why she withdrew $6,000 in cash. “RBC policies and procedures did not require clients to explain the purposes for withdrawing cash,” her claim states. “RBC’s ongoing suspicion of the Plaintiff was grounded solely upon the Plaintiff being of Middle Eastern descent and being a POC.” The bank denies the allegations.“In my opinion, had I, a white “Christian” male presented a valid Canadian passport as ID, RBC wouldn’t have phoned the police, frozen my account, and questioned me the following day about what the money was for,” said Ramadan’s lawyer Christopher Murphy. In its statement of defence RBC said it was Ramadan’s own actions that led its employees to believe she was committing identity theft. It says she did not order the cash in advance and was “disrespectful and unco-operative” at the first bank; when asked for her local address, she told the employee she didn’t have to give it to the bank, that it was private. It says she was asked to leave after that first transaction and told her behaviour was not acceptable. The bank’s statement characterizes its actions as due diligence to protect its clients from fraud, but Murphy disagrees. “Distilled into its essence, RBC’s defence is that Dana — a person of colour — became uppity when questioned about her valid ID, so RBC was justified in reporting her to the police,” Murphy said.“Rather than apologizing for their reprehensible conduct, RBC continues to blame Ms. RBC’s lack of insight into their practices should concern all people of colour who bank at RBC.”Ramadan is seeking $170,000 in damages plus loss of income and legal costs. She is also seeking “aggravated and punitive damages” from the bank employees and police officers involved, “in order to deter the defendants, or those similarly situated, from taking such wrongful actions in the future.”This case comes on the heels of another incident in the public eye where Maxwell Johnson, a Heiltsuk Nation man and his granddaughter were handcuffed and detained at a BMO branch in Vancouver when they went to open an account. In that case, BMO maintains there were problems with their ID that included an Indian status card and birth certificate. It accepts that the bank should never have called police, but that bank, too, denies racism was a factor in that decision. Rbc peel banque royale kenogami RBC Wealth Management serves the needs of high net worth, affluent and institutional clients worldwide through a full range of tailored solutions. Is there any problem with reaching the RBC Royal bank of Canada in Peel & Sherbrooke, Boucherville, Canada Address or Phone number? Please report any issues using the below comment form. Rate your experience with the RBC Royal bank of Canada Peel & Sherbrooke in Boucherville, Canada click on the stars below RBC Branch and ATM Locator. Address Bramalea City Centre 25 Peel Centre Dr Brampton, ON, L6T 3R5 Phone 905 790-7120 Transit # 792. Branch Details. Branch Hours. Routing Number is used in Canada to identify the bank and the branch to which the payment is directed. Routing number for Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) have two formats:1. Paper Transaction Routing Number: Routing transit number for paper items (or MICR-encoded items) is in the format of XXXXX-YYY which is comprised of a five-digit branch transit number (XXXXX) and a three-digit financial institution number (YYY).2. Electronic Payments Routing Number: It's a 9 digit number which starts with 0 used for electronic fund transactions. If paper routing is XXXXX-YYY, then EFT routing number will be 0YYYXXXXX. Main Br - Montreal Royal Direct-Montreal Support Admin*CSM* Lloyds of London*CSM* Montreal Trust Quebec PC Visa Processing Mtl SD BSC Management Mtl HO TB CDAMtl Cash Ops. CTR-PTB Processing Private Banking Montreal (0931)Mtl-IRP Mtl East-South Shore Royal Trust Mortgage Centre Mtl Sd-Close Account Que Hdq Montreal Br Coupon Dept Mtl Sd BSC Commercial Coll Prog PVM Specialized (Mtl)-CFSMtl QC IRP South Shore Estrie Beauce Quebec-Saguenay/Lac St Jean-Mauricie QC Sales Manager-Support Group Private Banking Montreal Succursale 4977 Jean-Talon ORT-Commercial Mtges - Quebec SB Centre de Montreal Intl Finance Ctr/GTS SLS-Mtl Succursale Wellington & Young Bank of Montreal (1613) Bank of Nova Scotia (2185) Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) (2114) CENTRAL 1 CREDIT UNION (1182) CREDIT UNION CENTRAL ALBERTA LIMITED (372) CREDIT UNION CENTRAL OF MANITOBA (224) CREDIT UNION CENTRAL OF SASKATCHEWAN (356) FEDERATION DES CAISSES DESJ.